In Some Parts of the World, Going Global Means English

[Jakarta, LTTW] Music is as common as language, and even likely almost as old. Different and unique music derived from different culture exist on Earth; from the most “complex” ones to the least. From the Europe to the Andes, Japan to the Saharan Dessert in Africa, we can find both music and language that probably has been with us from ancient times to the present.

From the culture point of view, music was developed within the mechanism of humans’ development happened since the dawn of time, where language being as one of the determinant factors (along with technology, ideology, politics, economy, and nature) in shaping the identities of many musical structures around the world. In other words, our prehistoric ancestors had to create their own music based entirely on their surrounding context. This is what makes an African chant was far different from a Gregorian, as well as Indian singing compare to the Bulgarian.

For centuries, the development of music and language was running good, until eons later—in the times of globalization—when one language became a big fuzz for musicians and industrialists in some parts of the world. The use of one language alas means English, as the official corporate and finance language around the globe, apparently brought a great impact within almost in every aspects of our daily lives; including music. The fact that in most ‘developing country’s’ music (and arts)—like the increasing use of English lyrics in the phenomenal K-Pop music—are being structured by other culture influence, certainly will makes us wonder, are we doing it for the artistic reason or just for the sake of ‘going global’? So do we really like K-pop because it’s different (uniquely Korean) or because it’s familiar?

Here’s an article questioning about whether the increasing English lyrics are good for Korean Music Industry.

(AA/BP)